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Shoulder & Elbow
Physicians

Fellowship Trained

Michael Cooney, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine & Arthroscopy

Interests: Sports Medicine, Trauma-Related Injuries, Arthroscopy, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, Total Shoulder Replacement, Fracture Management, General Orthopaedics, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Shoulder Surgery

Brian W. Hill, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Shoulder & Elbow

Interests: Shoulder Surgery, Arthroscopy, General Orthopaedics, Fracture Management, Sports Medicine, Trauma-Related Injuries, Elbow Surgery, Total Elbow Replacement, Total Shoulder Replacement

John Hinson, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Shoulder & Elbow Surgery

Interests: Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, General Orthopaedics, Shoulder Surgery, Total Shoulder Replacement, Total Elbow Replacement

Michael Leighton, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine

Interests: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, General Orthopaedics, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Shoulder Surgery, Total Shoulder Replacement, Trauma-Related Injuries

Scott Norris, D.O.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine

Interests: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, General Orthopaedics, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, Fracture Management, Shoulder Surgery, Trauma-Related Injuries

Gary Wexler, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine

Interests: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy

Treating

Michael Cooney, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine & Arthroscopy

Interests: Sports Medicine, Trauma-Related Injuries, Arthroscopy, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, Total Shoulder Replacement, Fracture Management, General Orthopaedics, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Shoulder Surgery

Kenneth Gerszberg, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle

Interests: General Orthopaedics, Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Trauma-Related Injuries, Total Ankle Replacement, Foot & Ankle Surgery

Justin Kearse, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Hand/Wrist/Upper Extremity Surgery

Interests: Hand Surgery

James Kerpsack, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery

Interests: Pediatric Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, General Orthopaedics, Hand Surgery, Shoulder Surgery, Trauma-Related Injuries

Michael Leighton, M.D.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine

Interests: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, General Orthopaedics, Pediatric Orthopaedics, Shoulder Surgery, Total Shoulder Replacement, Trauma-Related Injuries

Scott Norris, D.O.
Fellowship Trained: Sports Medicine

Interests: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, General Orthopaedics, Total Hip Replacement, Total Knee Replacement, Fracture Management, Shoulder Surgery, Trauma-Related Injuries

Andrew Seltzer, D.O.
Fellowship Trained: Hand/Wrist/Upper Extremity Surgery

Interests: Arthroscopy, Fracture Management, General Orthopaedics, Hand/Wrist Surgery, Total Knee Replacement, Total Wrist Joint Replacement, Total Finger Joint Replacement

Conditions

AC Joint Arthritis (Acromioclavicular Joint Arthritis)

AC joint arthritis (also called acromioclavicular joint arthritis) affects a joint at the top of your shoulder. It's where the shoulder blade's bony protrusion (called the "acromion") meets the clavicle (collarbone). This joint acts as a pivot point when you raise your arm above your head.

Biceps Tendon Tear (at the Shoulder)

Tendons are strong bands of tissue that connect muscle to bone. With this injury, one of the tendons anchoring your biceps muscle is torn. It may be torn partially or completely. Because the biceps is attached with two separate tendons, you may find that you can still use your biceps muscle even if one tendon is completely torn.

Biceps Tendonitis

Biceps tendonitis is a problem with a tendon in your shoulder. Most often, it's in the "long head of biceps" tendon, which travels from the front of your upper arm to the top of your shoulder socket. With this condition, the tendon becomes painfully inflamed or irritated.

Biceps Tendonitis (at the Elbow)

This is a problem with a tendon in your elbow. It's called the "distal biceps tendon." It connects the biceps muscle of your upper arm to the radius bone at the elbow. With this condition, the tendon becomes painfully inflamed or irritated.

Biceps Tenodesis

This surgery repairs a biceps tendon in your shoulder. It fixes a tendon that is partially torn, or completely torn, from the bone.

Bursitis of the Shoulder (Subacromial Bursitis)

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac called the "subacromial bursa." It's in the shoulder, between a bony protrusion called the "acromion" and the rotator cuff. You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissue. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. We call that "bursitis."

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

This condition, also called "ulnar nerve entrapment," happens to the ulnar nerve in your elbow. This nerve travels along the inner side of your elbow and down to your hand. It's the nerve that makes the jolt you feel when you bump your "funny bone." With this condition, your ulnar nerve is compressed, stretched or irritated.

Elbow Bursitis

This is a swelling of a fluid-filled sac in the back of your elbow. This sac is called the "olecranon bursa." You have similar sacs near other large joints throughout your body. They act as cushions between your bones and your soft tissues. Normally they have a small amount of fluid inside them. But sometimes they can swell. That is called "bursitis."

Fracture of the Greater Tuberosity

This is a shoulder injury. It's a break of the bony bump on the outer side of the humerus. That's the bone of your upper arm. The greater tuberosity is the place where three muscles of the rotator cuff attach. So a fracture here hurts your shoulder's stability and movement.

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

This is stiffening of your shoulder. It happens over time, and you may not know what caused it. With a frozen shoulder, it can be hard for you to be as active as you like.

Glenoid Labrum Tear

If you have pain in your shoulder, you may have a torn labrum. That's the thick band of tissue that goes around your shoulder socket. It helps make the socket deeper. It cushions the bone of your upper arm and keeps it from slipping.

Hill-Sachs Lesion

This condition is a traumatic fracture of the humeral head that leaves an indentation in the bone. This changes the shape of the humeral head and can interfere with normal arm motion.

Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

This condition, commonly called tennis elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

Medial Apophysitis (Little Leaguer's Elbow)

This is an injury of a growth plate on the elbow's inner side. Growth plates are places where new bone tissue forms. They are found near the ends of the long bones of growing children. But growth plates are weaker than the surrounding bone. That makes them easier to injure.

Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer's Elbow)

This condition, commonly called golfer's elbow, is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the medial epicondyle, the bony bump on the inner side of the elbow.

Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative arthritis, is a gradual breakdown of cartilage in the joints. Cartilage is a tough, flexible connective tissue that protects the ends of bones in the joints. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder can severely impact a person's lifestyle.

Overuse Injuries of the Elbow

If you are an athlete, or if you work with your arms and hands, your elbows may be at risk for an overuse injury. This is an injury caused by repetitive motions. This type of injury can be a problem for people who play sports such as tennis or baseball. Children also have a higher risk, because their bones are still growing.

Proximal Humerus Fracture (Broken Shoulder)

This condition is a fracture of the head of the humerus - the "ball" of the shoulder's ball-and-socket.

Rotator Cuff Injuries

The rotator cuff muscles and tendons hold your upper arm bone in your shoulder socket. A hard fall, repetitive arm motions or problems with the structure of your shoulder can injure the rotator cuff.

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons in each shoulder. It holds your upper arm bone in your shoulder socket. It keeps your arm stable while allowing it to lift and rotate. Too much stress on the rotator cuff can cause a tear. This can be a painful injury.

SLAP Tear (Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior Tear)

This is a shoulder injury. It's a tear of the labrum. That's a ring of cartilage that surrounds the shoulder socket and helps hold the head of the humerus in place. This type of tear happens where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum.

Shoulder Dislocation

The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint. The ball of your upper arm bone fits into a socket in your shoulder blade. If the ball slips out, your shoulder has "dislocated."

Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

This is a painful pinching of soft tissues in your shoulder. It happens when these tissues rub and press against a part of your shoulder blade called the "acromion." This can irritate your rotator cuff tendons, and also a soft sac called the "subacromial bursa."

Shoulder Instability

This is a looseness of the shoulder joint. With it, your arm slides around too much in the socket. It may slip out of the socket easily. Instability can happen because the ligaments that hold your shoulder together aren't tight enough. Or, the cartilage around your shoulder socket may be damaged.

Shoulder Separation

This is an injury of the acromioclavicular joint (commonly called the "AC" joint). This is the joint where the clavicle meets the scapula. A shoulder separation is a stretching or a tearing of the ligaments that support these bones. This allows the bones to move out of position.

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